Biomass Energy
Biomass Energy has been ruled an energy source that is equal to wind and solar power. (Image from http://www.solarpowernotes.com/renewable-energy/biomass-energy/biomass-energy.html)

Biomass Energy = Solar or Wind Energy?

Should Biomass Energy be given the same consideration?

Congress has passed two amendments to bipartisan energy bill, the “Energy Policy Modernization Act,” ruling that biomass energy is a renewable energy source on par with wind and solar according to federal law.

However, argument continues to wage on as to whether biomass deserves to be given the same considerations as wind and solar, another question looms: Will the ruling help the biomass industry grow? And will it create more jobs?

There are, of course, complications to considering burning wood and other natural materials (or “forest debris”) as carbon neutral, but the fact remains that jobs in the industry do exist. Companies like Ameresco build and operate biomass facilities and have postings of available positions.

Open positions are available across the nation in a wide range of different roles. They include everything from sales account executive to truck drivers and specific roles like steam trap technician. Make sure you do your homework to understand the qualifications necessary to fill any role in the biomass energy industry.

American Council on Renewable Energy is another great resource for jobs in this sector. Search through the different job boards to find the biomass energy role you’re looking for in an area you’d like to live and work.

For further reading on the Senate ruling, E & E Publishing, LLC, has a full report on the amendments and what they could mean to the biomass energy. If nothing else, it’s certainly a good time to learn more about the industry and stay tuned to see if the Amendments are passed by President Obama. Perhaps biomass energy will be the next to see a boom.

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