Hydrogeologists are increasingly in demand in today's energy jobs sector. (Image from https://www.eco.ca/blog/5-things-you-didnt-know-about-hydrogeologists/)

Energy Jobs: Hydrogeologist Jobs on Rise

As we strive to learn more about our planet and how to best utilize her resources, many are making the shift into the “green jobs” sector. People moving into green jobs seek stability, profitability, and to make a positive impact on Mother Earth and protect our future.

One job in particular is in demand–a hydrogeologist job, particularly in California. Perhaps you’ve heard about the ongoing drought?

What is hydrogeology?

While geology is the study of the Earth, hydrogeology (hydro means water) deals with the distribution and movement of groundwater in the soil and rocks of the Earth’s crust. Hydrogeologists are like water detectives. This blog on the US Geological Survey has a good breakdown on hydrogeology and what hydrogeologists do, as does this video from hydrogeologist, Jennifer Chapman-Kleski. This video from Nora Donald shares her thoughts on the role hydrogeologists will play in the years to come.

Hydrogeologists in the academic field are expanding their horizons to help with forecasting and mitigating the impacts of climate change, specifically examining how climate change will impact aquatic life and water resources. They are also stretching their field’s traditional boundaries to explore questions concerning the interaction of groundwater with rivers’ and lakes’ surface water.

How can I become a hydrogeologist, and what work can I do?

A four-year degree will be required to find a position as a hydrogeologist, but here’s a quick Hydrogeology 101 video to get started. There are also a wide range of opportunities available within hydrogeology. This video gives a breakdown on what roles are available and the work that goes into them.

Hydrogeologists can better our water conservation and purification practices as a hydrogeologist or hydrogeology engineer. They can direct teams, research projects, or lab crews as a senior project manager, hydrogeology site manager, or senior hydrogeologist. It’s a viable recession-proof position for those who want to be out in the field, but still offers plenty of opportunity to work in an office or lab while helping to preserve Mother Earth for years to come.

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