Surveying the Ecology around Us

Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, Calif. (Apr. 5, 2004) – Martin Ruane, a base ecologist on board Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC), Calif., conducts routine observations and surveys to monitor the different animal species that have made habitats in and around Mugu Lagoon on NBVC Point Mugu. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 2nd Class Chris Perkins. (RELEASED)

Our world is made up of different living organisms around us. These include oceanic wildlife, animals, birds, reptiles, trees and of course us human beings.  All these living organisms are existing in the same nature and share the same resources of the nature and physical environment around us. The relationship between the various living organisms and its impact on the surrounding physical environment is the study of ecology.

Surveying means collection of information and data about a particular field and analyzing the results of this data. There are two important surveys that help us understand the impact and changes in our surroundings. These are Tree surveys and Ecological Surveys.

Tree Surveys and their Importance:

Tree survey is basically surveying all the trees in the area. This means that finding out the number of trees, what type they are, how old they are and how many more years will they live depending on their age and health. Tree Surveys give you the exact information about the trees on a particular piece of land and helps you make decisions like which trees need to be protected and which need to be or can be cut down. This helps save the environment by preserving trees that should not be cut and also tells you if any tree is hazardous in the area.

Ecological Surveys and their Importance

Ecological survey is surveying the entire ecology of a particular area. It helps understand the ecology of the area and the impacts of human beings in that area or the possible impacts that may occur due to some activities in the future. It is used by people planning to use a particular area of land. It helps them assess what species, plants or ecosystems are there in the area and need to be protected. They can then work their way around it and not disturb the environment.

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