Solar Impulse
Solar Impulse 2 traveled from Ahmedabad to Varanasi as part of its worldwide journey. (Image from http://www.solarimpulse.com/leg-3-from-Ahmedabad-to-Varanasi)

Solar Impulse – Ahmedabad to Varanasi

Solar Impulse Series: Leg 3 – Ahmedabad to Varanasi

Solar Impulse 2 continued its journey around the world with a cross-country flight in India from Ahmedabad to Varanasi, a journey of 1170 kilometers (720 miles). The trip was completed in 13 hours and 15 minutes.

Pilot Andre Borschberg and the team experienced delays taking off because of customs issues, but eventually everything was sorted out. Mission co-founder, Bertrand Piccard also ran into problems trying to depart because of a missing document but was able to get his passport stamped and make it to Varanasi in time for the landing.

The flight itself was incident free as Borschberg passed over India’s countryside, doing yoga and meditating while in the confines of the small cockpit. Once on the ground, Borschberg and Piccard held one of the mission’s largest press conference yet to spread the message of clean energy: If an airplane can fly around the world using only the energy from the sun, clean technologies can be used on the ground to solve climate change. The plan for the mission ahead is to stop at various locations around the globe, rest and carry out maintenance (and charge the batteries), before setting off to the next location. Meanwhile, Solar Impulse will spread its message about clean technologies and moving toward a sustainable future.

Highlights from this leg of the journey can be viewed on the Solar Impulse YouTube channel.

Varanasi is just a quick, few-hour pit-stop on the journey to switch pilots back to Piccard before taking off again to Myanmar.

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