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Geologists are increasingly being used, so universities could see more geology majors in the years ahead © U.S. Green Technology

Universities Could See Influx of Geology Jobs from Trump?

The Trump Jobs Wave?

With Donald Trump securing the presidential election, one of his proclaimed first orders of business is a re-focus on coal production and jobs. While the focus of his plan is domestic, it could have a windfall felt around the world.

According to studies, if we were to enter into another global mining boom, there may not be enough universities that offer bachelor degrees in geology to meet the demand for their services.

“The current cohort of geologists is ageing, but there are far fewer universities offering industry-relevant geology degrees.” says mining software solutions provider MICROMINE technical product manager Frank Bilki in Mining Weekly. “In Australia, only James Cook University offers a Bachelor of Geology, while other Australian universities offer Bachelor of Science degrees with geology as a major. This will become an issue as more geologists retire and are not replaced by recent graduates.”

Universities in South Africa that offer a Bachelor of Geology include Rhodes University, the University of the Witwatersrand, the University of Johannesburg and the University of the Free State.

Geologists are increasingly being used as production line workers. Each geologist is given a specific job where they will specialize in planning, supervising, interpreting or modeling. This may be because it is easier for large companies to hire and terminate contract geologists who satisfy specific job requirements, than to hire geologists with end-to-end ownership of a project.

While this may make the field less attractive, the trend could be changing. Industry experts argue that good fieldwork is vital to the success of projects, meaning competent geologists will be needed. Companies will need to provide training, and that end-to-end ownership to make opportunities more attractive. But it all starts with universities offering programs to students to get into the field before these potential jobs open up.

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