Clinton Administration
More environmental jobs could be generated under the Hillary Clinton administration. Image from CNN

Clinton Administration Could Pave Way for More Environmental Jobs

Clean energy advocates see job growth opportunities under the Hillary Clinton administration

With the Republican and Democratic conventions now over, the campaign for our next president is in full swing and inching ever closer to its conclusion. Following the close of the DNC, clean energy advocates see job growth opportunities under the Hillary Clinton administration.

Clinton promises to increase investment in the clean energy sector, which would help twofold with environmental pollution, and, of course–jobs. Transitioning from fossil fuels to clean energy is a priority of the administration. With climate change being an undeniable fact, the nation doesn’t have to make a choice between addressing it responsibly and boosting the economy.

So how do you do both? By increasing clean energy jobs. During her speech at the DNC, Clinton said that if she were elected, within her first 100 days as president, she would work with both parties to pass the biggest investment in new, good-paying jobs since World War II. Clean energy jobs would be a big part of that plan.

Her plan is also backed by the Democratic Party. Democrats are committed to boosting clean energy jobs, and they listed “Creating Good-Paying Clean Energy Jobs” in their 2016 plan under its broader job creation section. The party also wants to prioritize training and hiring people in communities that are overburdened with pollution. These individuals would be trained for jobs designed to expand clean energy, energy efficiency, and resilient infrastructure.

Currently, more than 2.5 million people work in clean energy jobs. Many of them have entered the industry in the last 10 years. A win for the Clinton administration could see this growth rate rise even higher.

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