Death Star
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story Death Star Ph: Film Frame ©Lucasfilm LFL

What is the Cost of Making the Death Star LEED Gold Certified?

In 2012–13, a proposal on the White House’s website urging the United States government to build a real Death Star as an economic stimulus and job creation measure gained more than 30,000 signatures

Cars are going green (think, Chevrolet Vault). Even aircraft are going green (think, Southwest Airlines, which unveiled an environmentally friendly plane back in 2009). Maybe it’s time to take things to the next level (think, outer space – and specifically, think about the Death Star from “Star Wars“). Exactly how much would it cost to make this well-known, fictional 30-year-old moon-sized space station so green that it becomes LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Gold Certified?

The idea is worth a thought if you want to have a little fun. After all, “Star Wars” fans for years have been crunching the numbers to figure out how much money would be required to reproduce this 1977 superweapon – one that has the unparalleled ability to destroy a planet. (In “Star Wars,” the Death Star was used to obliterate Alderaan, Princess Leia’s planet.)

A young child might guess “a bajillion” dollars as the cost to create this phenomenon. He really wouldn’t be too far off.

Centives.net economics blog writers have studied this very topic and actually came to the conclusion that the cost to produce the Death Star would equal 13,000 times the world’s gross domestic product. To be exact, that would be $852,000,000,000,000,000 – or $825 quadrillion. That’s not too far off from technology blog Gizmodo’s 2009 estimate of an investment of $15.6 septillion to create this phenomenon.

Any investors available?

Becoming LEED Gold Certified likewise would come at a steep price for the Death Star. An estimated soft cost for the Jean Vollum Natural Capital Center in Portland, Ore., was $322,000 – or an estimated 3.2 percent of construction costs. This facility was about 70,000 square feet.

If you apply this same principle to the Death Star and figure that construction costs would be $825 quadrillion for the superweapon, then the cost for the Death Star to become LEED Gold Certified would be 26,400,000,000,000,000 – or basically $26.4 quadrillion. These costs include design efforts by engineers/architects, LEED application fees and energy modeling and don’t even take into consideration construction-related costs.

Without a doubt, making the Death Star green would cost a pretty penny. It sure makes greening your own house or business look a lot more affordable and practical.

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